ANNE HAWKINS PRESENTS “LAWBREAKERS FOR THE COMMON GOOD” AT SUMNER COUNTY HISTORICAL & GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

/ANNE HAWKINS PRESENTS “LAWBREAKERS FOR THE COMMON GOOD” AT SUMNER COUNTY HISTORICAL & GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

ANNE HAWKINS PRESENTS “LAWBREAKERS FOR THE COMMON GOOD” AT SUMNER COUNTY HISTORICAL & GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

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Date/Time
Date(s) - 02/26/2018
6:30 pm

Location
Wellington Public Library

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Presentation Explores Underground Railroad during Slavery

Wellington, Kansas – Sumner County Historical & Genealogical Society in Wellington, Kansas will host “Lawbreakers for the Common Good,” a multi-media presentation and discussion led by Anne Hawkins on February 26th at 6:30 p.m. at the Wellington Public Library, 121 W. 7th, Wellington.  Members of the community are invited to attend the free program. Contact Jane at 620-441-9835 or Sherry at 316-833-6161 for more information. The program is made possible by the Kansas Humanities Council.

“A native Kansan, Anne Hawkins grew up in a 19th-century limestone farmhouse, tapping the walls in closets and examining floorboards, hoping to find secret passageways and hidden rooms where escaped slaves could harbor.  Finding none, she looked instead in archives, to learn where fugitives in the Free State hid and were helped to freedom.

Anne teaches U.S. history at Washburn University, and classes in U.S. and world history, and historical detection, for homeschooled students ages 5-18 in northeast Kansas.  She also serves as a Kansas Humanities Council scholar and was an historical consultant for the KHC “Shared Stories of the Civil War” project, compiling a readers’ theater script from first-person accounts of the Underground Railroad in Kansas Territory.   She has published numerous articles on state history in Kansas Kaleidoscope magazine, and an historical study of black Kansas farm families in Kansas History: Journal of the Central Plains. ”

Hawkins’s presentation explores true accounts of the little-known people who worked illegally on the Underground Railroad in Kansas, the secret network that helped guide enslaved people to freedom.  In the mid-1800s, some Kansans defied federal, state, and territorial laws in pursuit of a common goal: liberty for all.

“Operatives–both white and black–worked together secretly on the Kansas Underground Railroad.  But what we often overlook in the excitement of these tales is that these underground railroad workers were lawbreakers. Slave owners and bounty hunters in the U.S. had the might of the law on their side,” Hawkins said. “Kansans literally lay their lives on the line to help freedom seekers. And the ways they worked together for the common good offer examples of what is possible for equality and justice in our own time.”

“Lawbreakers for the Common Good” is part of the Kansas Humanities Council’s Kansas Stories Speakers Bureau, featuring presentations and discussions that examine our shared human experience—our innovations, culture, heritage, and conflicts.

The Kansas Humanities Council conducts and supports community-based programs, serves as a financial resource through an active grant-making program, and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and cultural life of their communities.  For more information about KHC programs contact the Kansas Humanities Council at 785/357-0359 or visit online at www.kansashumanities.org.

For more information about “Lawbreakers for the Common Good” in Wellington, Kansas contact the Sumner County Historical and Genealogical Society’s Jane Moore at 620-441-9835 or Sherry Kline at 316-833-6161 for more information or visit www.ks-schgs.blogspot.com.

By |2018-02-19T22:49:46+00:00February 26th, 2018|0 Comments

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